Place making can be defined as a collaborative process of creating environments that people are attracted to, and have ownership of. But what happens if the community doesn’t have the capacity (ability, time and/or interest), to get involved in the first place?
Destination planning aims to limit the negative impacts of cultural tourism upon the history and lifestyles of the local community
Michael Mobbs is a proud and long time Chippendale resident who has successfully translated his own passion for the environment and sustainable living into a physical and social makeover of his local street.
Jane Jacobs, (May 4, 1916 – April 25, 2006) was an American-Canadian writer and activist with primary interest in communities and urban planning and decay.
Places are complex systems with many elements that contribute to their success. A recent survey, conducted by Place Partners Director Kylie Legge, took up the challenge of identifying what criteria are most valued by the people who use public places in Sydney.
City image can be defined as the sum of beliefs, ideals and impressions people have toward a certain place.
Community capacity building empowers communities to respond independently to their own challenges and opportunities.
Kylie Legge was recently asked to write an article for Res Publica, a leading magazine publication in Poland, on place making in Australia.
Oldenburg explores the concept of including an informal public place to our everyday lives, that is, a place that complements the home and work, a place to relax, socialise and always be welcome.
Cultural tourism invites visitors to appreciate the richness of a place through its history and archaeology, the lifestyles of its people, its economic and political structures and the built and natural landscape.
The Australian Government acknowledges that world class design and a focus on developing places for people can only be achieved through an integrated approach.
Originally referring to the presiding protective deity or spirit of the place, in contemporary usage, 'genius loci', refers to a location's distinctive placeness, that is its past, current and future essence.