Place activation is defined as planning for diverse human activity in a place. When planning new places, the focus of place activation is on ensuring the needs of all potential users are met.
Cultural tourism invites visitors to appreciate the richness of a place through its history and archaeology, the lifestyles of its people, its economic and political structures and the built and natural landscape.
The act of revitalisation is generally considered only necessary where there has been failure - if an area has been allowed to degenerate physically, economically and socially.
The Sydney Morning Herald article 'A keen sense of place' features Kylie Legge talking about place making: what is is, where it's come from and where it might be heading in the future. The article also interviews Jody Summers from Stockland, Gilbert Rochecouste from Village Well, and Dr Beau Beza from RMIT.
Kylie Legge, place maker and author of 'Doing it Differently' discusses why creating magnetic places isn't just the responsibility of government and the corporate sector - we all have a role in it. (Page 112 of the SCOOP magazine)
Our most recent poll on the Place Partners website asked ‘What activities would attract you to visit and spend time in a place?’ So what did you think?
Place making can be defined as a collaborative process of creating environments that people are attracted to, and have ownership of. But what happens if the community doesn’t have the capacity (ability, time and/or interest), to get involved in the first place?
Places are complex systems with many elements that contribute to their success. A recent survey, conducted by Place Partners Director Kylie Legge, took up the challenge of identifying what criteria are most valued by the people who use public places in Sydney.
The Australian Government acknowledges that world class design and a focus on developing places for people can only be achieved through an integrated approach.
Destination planning aims to limit the negative impacts of cultural tourism upon the history and lifestyles of the local community
Oldenburg explores the concept of including an informal public place to our everyday lives, that is, a place that complements the home and work, a place to relax, socialise and always be welcome.
Generative: capable of producing or creating